Why vote? ALEC and the Doctrine of Exclusion

Frequently, when going forward it is imperative to examine your history.  In 1638 the Maryland Colony issued a public edict encouraging the separation of the races that became the public policy of America. The edict became known as the “Doctrine of Exclusion.” The edict stated that, “Neither the existing Black population, their descendants nor any other Blacks shall be permitted to enjoy the fruits of white society.”  Eventually other colonies picked up the edict and passed their own laws that collectively became known as the Slave Codes of 1705.

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Modern Day Black Republicans: Aiding and Abetting Voter Suppression

There is a deafening silence in the ranks of modern Black Republicans who stand mute as their party of choice relentlessly attacks the civil right that is most responsibility for the rights, and privileges of democracy, the right to vote. There is a group of them that gathers with the Tea Partiers, Sean Hannity, and other Republican right wingers to denounce President Obama, and so-called liberal democrats as representing everything that is bad for Blacks in America, and accusing them of race exploitation.  I watch them in amazement as they claim to defend the constitution, and that Obama ignores it. They’re very unbalanced in their zeal to demean Black Democrats as they ignore the constitutional guarantee of “one man and one vote,” and the massive voter suppression efforts of their Republican party.

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The Third Reconstruction vs. The New Confederacy

Over the past months I’ve written about the necessity of Black voters requiring patronage in return for electing politicians to office, political accountability and the Voter Empowerment Summit. This week I’ll highlight ongoing discussions and I’ll address what I consider the most positive political development that I’ve witnessed in North Carolina since the selection of Sen. Dan Blue as North Carolina’s first Black Speaker of the NC House of Representatives.

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